Tag Archives: celta

The Unspoken Rule to Survive CELTA or Delta

For some, this post might seem a cliche. However, I decided to write about the issue due to the fact that this ‘rule’ is usually overlooked.

Many people who did CELTA or Delta have told me that it was really a bad experience. That wasn’t because of the nature of the course, their tutors, the pressure, the amount of work needed to be done, nor lack of knowledge. It was simply because of their peers.

I’ve heard about a lot of people who would fight during the course, or provide each other with destructive criticism, rather than constructive one. Or, not sharing materials with other peers.

During my CELTA and Delta, it was a privilege from me to meet friendly, kind, collaborative, and caring people (shout out to my CELTA peers: Tatyana, Fatma, Idil, Alper, Tevhide, and Taylan. And for my Delta peers Duygu, Romina, Ebru, Charles, Saoirsi, Basak, Maria, John, Nastya, Gamze, and Dilek.) We collaborated a lot and comforted each other when any of us had gone through a bad TP or was feeling stressed because of what was coming. We shared materials, resources, books, activities, plans, feedback, and food. I’ll always be grateful for them because they have made the courses an even better experience.

An important reminder

What you need to know is that you’re not assessed on how many times you answer a question, nor when you dominate a feedback or an input session. You’re not going to be assessed against your peers, and there’s no ‘the teacher’s favorite student’ here. Nothing of what I’ve mentioned will affect your grade.

You will be assessed based on your performance when writing assignments and teaching lessons against a list of criteria, that’s it. So, trashing your peers’ lesson will do no good for both parties. Nor hiding materials/resources would.

Another thing to add, is that helping other teachers (in this case your peers) is a kind of professional development. Simply because you’ll help them to overcome troubles, listen to how they react to an arising issue, and the list goes on.

A Final Word

Collaborate, and enjoy the experience with your peers so when you or they talk about their course later on, you will all have a smile on your face. Doing such a course is a great opportunity to meet professional, developing teachers, and you will probably be friends for life. In the end, it is only a course that lasts for a few weeks, so why not make those weeks count?

 

 

Image credit: Freepik

Cambridge CELTA in a Nutshell (an infographic)

Update: read this post to know the benefits of CELTA and take the quiz!

Ever since I’ve finished my CELTA in December 2014, I’ve been contacted by countless people from all over the world (I hope you are reading this post) who want to take CELTA. And always, I was happy to help my fellow colleagues.

That’s why I’ve decided to create this infographic hoping it would be helpful for teachers who don’t know what CELTA is. or what it does offer. And to function as  Cambridge CELTA introduction. Of course, this is not what all is CELTA about. To know ALL about CELTA you gotta read the CELTA Course Trainee Book, or take the course yourself  😉

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Cambridge CELTA Introduction. An infographic about Cambridge CELTA.
Cambridge CELTA Introduction. An infographic about Cambridge CELTA.

 

did you find this infographic helpful? Was it a good Cambridge CELTA Introduction?
do you have any question or comment about CELTA? then ask or comment in the comment box.

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