Cambridge DELTA Module One in a Nutshell (an infographic)

I have created this Cambridge DELTA Module One infographic to function as a simple introduction to module 1. In the infographic I have listed the tasks of paper 1 and paper 2, the marks available for each task, what is the task about, and what to read to prepare for the task.

When to start reading?

It’s a good idea to start reading early for Module 1. So, if you are planning to take the course in December, maybe you’d like to start reading as early as January since there’s a lot to cover, and not to mention that you are already working full-time. The readings in the infographic are suggestions and you might wanna read more to be able to score high, or get your head round the topic.

How to prepare?

To prepare for DELTA Module One, you can either study on your own and sit for the exam. Or, you can take a preparation course with a center. From my experience, I’ve found the course to be a great option, since it provides you with practice, feedback, tips, and techniques to tackle the tasks.

I’m taking the a preparation course at ITI Istanbul. They run a great course online and they offer a HUGE advantage: you can retake the course as many times as you want without having to pay again till you pass the test! (NOTE: I’m not an affiliate for ITI Istanbul nor was asked to talk about their course here. I’m doing it out of love. They did a great job, and still doing so since I haven’t sat for the exam this June.)

Some Random Thoughts

You can take the preparation course for DELTA Module One in a center and sit for the exam in another. It won’t be an issue.
Module One exam fee is 140 GBP and you pay it once you decide to sit for the exam (the fee might vary).
You need to register for the exam at least 4 or 5 weeks before its date.
Once you pay for the exam you can’t postpone it. (meaning you can’t take back your money or change the date of your exam).

The Inforgraphic

click on the image for a larger version

Cambridge DELTA Module One
Cambridge DELTA Module One

CELTA Planner

Before you read this post, if you wanna know more about CELTA check out my posts: CELTA in a Nutshell and Why Do I need to take CELTA?

Summer has come, and with it comes the time when motivated teachers do their CELTA course. So, I’ve decided to create this planner to keep the candidates on track. Print it on an A3 sheet, and you are good to go!

CELTA Planner
CELTA Planner

There are 2 formats of the planner. One for the course of 8 TPs, and the other for 6 TPs. What does that mean??
Well, in the course you have to teach 6 observed hours. These 6 hours might be spread over 8 TPs (lessons), 6 TPs, or any other number. The most common ones are 8 and 6. That’s why you can find 2 formats, pick the one that you’ll be doing, and tick as you go!

The Calendar

You might wanna mark the days of your TPs on the calendar. Your TPs will be on either Tuesdays and Thursdays, or Wednesdays and Fridays (provided that your centers follows the 8 TPs format and not another one, like 6 TPs.)

If your course will have a different number of TPs, you might wanna ask your tutor/center about the days of your TPs so you can mark them on the calendar.

 

Action Points

I have created on the planner a spot for ‘Action Points’. Action points are the elements related to your teaching practice that you need to work on for the next TPs. They could be giving instructions, analyzing target language, using concept questions, monitoring, or any thing thing your tutor comments on in your TP Feedback.

I think it’s imperative that you write on the planner your action points, think about them, include them in your lesson objectives, and fulfill them to show that you are a developing and a reflective teacher.

You can download the planner from the following links. Feel free to share and comment 🙂

Should You Take Cambridge CELTA? (With an Outcome Quiz)

cambridge celtaWhy to Take CELTA? After introducing what CELTA is as a course and what it has to offer in my previous post, in this one I’m gonna tackle the question which many teachers ask (me): “Why should I take CELTA?”. Well, the best person to answer this question is you. (To be honest I always recommend taking the course if there is no financial problems. And that was my advice to my wife too!)

A word about me before taking the CELTA so you wouldn’t think I’m biased. I finished my B.A. in English Language and Literature in 2012, I followed that with starting M.A. in ELT. I finished 9 theoretical courses with their research papers, and 1 practicum module. Then I dropped out and left my country, Syria, due to the situation. So, as you see, when I took my CELTA course in 2014, I wasn’t new to the ELT world. To add, the reason I’m writing this post is due to the high number of people asking me whether CELTA would benefit them or not, and what is really there in CELTA that they would need to know and add to their skill set. All the issues that I’m addressing in post are firsthand experiences, and through the communication with other teachers which I do a lot.

There are many things to consider when thinking ‘why to take CELTA?’. One which is highly important is whether you hold a university degree in ELT, or English Language and Literature, or another field of study since this means whether you have ELT-related knowledge or not.

cambridge celta

Some other things that you need to consider are:

Have you been observed by a teacher trainer?

Why this is important: This is imperative, and I would argue that it is the most important element in teacher training, since we can’t notice everything we say and do in the language classroom. We need an objective view where someone else can observe us and give us feedback about our strengths and action points. This is important for those who are not new to teaching as much as it is for new teachers, because the issue of fossilized errors is in play here. Countless experienced teachers who decided to take CELTA after teaching for many years said that they didn’t know they should do this thing or that thing, in a specific way. A common problem among these teachers is TTT (teacher talk time). They all have commented/said that their CELTA tutors informed them that they talk (way) too much during the lesson and they should reduce their TTT time to raise STT (Student Talk Time).
How this is related to CELTA: As a CELTA trainee you’ll be observed by 2 experienced teacher trainers (a shout out to my awesome trainers Steve Darn and Billy Sevki Hasirci) who would provide you with valuable feedback regarding your teaching practice.

Have you observed other teachers in practice?

Why this is important: Well, now you can be that objective person and see other teacher in their teaching practice. You’ll be able to learn from their strengths and action points, and think about those and compare them to yours.
How this is related to CELTA: When taking CELTA you’ll have the chance of observing other trainees, and also experienced teachers. When observing other trainees, your tutor will provide you with a handout asking you to comment on specific teaching areas in that lesson. When observing experienced teachers, you’ll have to write an “observation report” about 250 words (as far as I remember) and hand it to your tutor.

Reflecting on your lessons:

Why this is important:Being a reflective teacher cannot be stressed enough. Taking some time to think after your lesson to consider what went well and what didn’t. Reflection would allow you to learn from your action points, and alter your lessons, aims, strategies, and techniques accordingly.
How this is related to CELTA: In CELTA, after each TP (lesson) you give, you have to write a self evaluation reflecting on how well your lesson went, what would you change, and how did the learners react to/during the lesson. Another thing is starting from your second lesson (TP 2) you should include in your lesson plan your personal aims for the lesson. And you can take that from the feedback form given to you by your tutor. For example, you should write like ‘in this lesson I will work on my TTT, or my target language.’

Have you analyzed language areas before?

Why this is important: it goes without saying that as a language teacher you do know grammar. However, have you analyzed grammar areas in terms of forms and functions? what is a tense and what is an aspect? how many tenses are there in English? (the answer to the last one would probably shock you!)
How this is related to CELTA: Many input sessions in CELTA are about language analysis. Although you won’t be taught grammar-this is a misconception that some candidates think CELTA includes a ‘grammar module.- but you will be taught how to analyze grammar areas. And trust me you gonna like this a lot.

Do you know how to teach language skills and systems?

Why this is important: Knowing how to teach the four skills (listening, reading, writing, and speaking)  Language Systems (pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and discourse) with their logical stages is what actually teaching is. And it’s not like ‘of course I do, I play the listening file and voila, that was listening skill’. For instance, each skill has stages like pre-reading, while-reading, and post-reading. And for each stage there are specific activities that would work well with one, but not with another.
How this is related to CELTA: In the course there will be input sessions about the skills and systems where you can learn the aforementioned stages, and experience them firsthand.

Some other ELT techniques that you will learn during CELTA are conducting feedback and varying the methods for it. Monitoring, when to monitor and how to monitor depending on the task at hand. Another one is correction, when to correct, how to correct, and varying your correction techniques. Giving and checking instructions to make sure your learners know what to do next. If you think the answer for those techniques are respectively: giving feedback is when telling my students ‘that’s good/work harder;’ 2 monitoring is simple I just look at my learners and walk around the classroom; 3 correction is when my students make a mistake I correct them and carry on; 4 and when it comes to instructions; that’s a piece of cake; I tell my learners ‘do this exercise,’ then I have to tell you that you surely need to take CELTA.

You also need to take into consideration what other advantages CELTA provides; better job perspectives to name one. I once had a talk with a language school manager in the UK. She said that whenever she gets job applications she categorize them as: those who have CELTA, and those who don’t. Another point is that many schools when posting job vacancies they ask for a certain number of years of experience AFTER certification. Another advantage is the ability to continue developing and get Cambridge DELTA. And let’s not forget that CELTA is provided by Cambridge University!

The Quiz!

Now let’s give you what you are here for, the quiz. Take this quiz which I have created based on the most important things that the CELTA will train you for. See for yourself whether you need to take the course or not. Don’t forget to share the quiz with your colleagues!

Now, tell me in the comments, what is your result, and has it changed your opinion?

DELTA Module Two Planner

UPDATE 28/5/2017: There was a mistake in the second planner and I have edited it. Please redownload it.

UPDATE 13/6/2017: I have added an eight-week version 🙂

My DELTA Module Two is starting this July, 2017. I know I should be very organized and manage my time properly since the course is highly intensive.  That’s why I’ve created these 2 planners which are for full-time DELTA Module Two courses. The calendars is a ready-to-print, A3 sized.

You can print them on A4-sized paper too, but it would look a bit small. Stick it on your wall, and tick as you go!

DELTA Module Two Planner
DELTA Module Two Planner

DELTA Module Two Planner
DELTA Module Two Planner

The abbreviations (They are used during the Module 2 course, so you need to learn them):

LSA: Language Systems/Skills Assignment
BE: Background Essay
LP: Lesson Plan
TP: Teaching Practice (the lesson that you will teach)
SE: Self Evaluation
PDA: Professional Development Assignment

Click on the the download link to get the planner:

                

Hope you like, and find them useful. I will write more posts about DELTA Module 2 once I finish the course this August. So, stay tuned to my blog 🙂
Good luck with your DELTA Module 2, and feel free to comment on and share this post 🙂

Vocabulary Revision Game

Vocabulary Revision Game

I prepare my students for Cambridge Exams (Flyers, KET, and PET). And since the examination date is just around the corner, I thought I should revise the vocabulary list. Also, my learners asked me for an activity or a game to revise the Flyers word list. So, I came up with the following game, and it went well!

You are going to need the Thematic Vocabulary List for Flyers. You can download the list from here (PDF file. Size 1.66 MB, taken form the Cambridge YLE Handbook.)

I grouped the learners into groups of 4s and 3s and asked each group to get 1 sheet of paper, and a pen/pencil for each student.

The instructions were that I’m going write a category on the board taken from the vocabulary list, and they will have 1 minute to write as much words as they know on their sheet, and when the time is up, they should stop. You can use the clock on the wall as a timer, or if you have a stopwatch on your phone. I used Google Stopwatch, and projected it on the board so the learners can know how much left. You can find it here. (press the CTRL key while clicking on the link to open it in a new tab.)
When the time was up, I asked each group to pass their sheet to the group next to them, and showed the aforementioned vocabulary list on the board. The learners checked the sheets against the vocabulary list. Giving 1 point for any word that is on the list, 2 points for any correct word that is not on the list, and crossing any word that doesn’t belong to the category or that is false in a way or another. And wrote their points under their team’s name on the board. If you don’t like having a competition in your classroom, you can skip writing the points on the board. However, my learners enjoyed that a lot!

After getting back their own sheets, I asked the learners to write on their notebooks any word that is on the list but they didn’t write, so they would learn and study this word later.

And that’s all about it. I’m gonna try out this activity with my KET and PET students and see how it goes!

What do you think about the activity? Any comments or alterations?

image source file

Passion for CPD: Webinars

You can access the page behind this post here, and if you like you can read the post too 🙂

There are many forms of continuing professional development, one that I just love is webinars. They’re held regularly, and tackle different issues in ELT. I always learn new things from webinars, that’s why I keep attending them. So far, I’ve attended more than 30 certified webinars, and half as much of recorded webinars.

Before going any further, I’d like to say that this is why I’ve decided to create The ELT Webinars Calendar. I’ll add the webinars that I know so you can check them and attend those who interest you. You can also find a form beneath the calendar which you can use to add an event or a webinar which is not already on the list. And beneath the form you can find links for recorded webinars in case you wanna watch some.

So, back to the track, here’s my list of reasons why you should attend webinars:
-You can access them on your desktop, laptop, tablet, and cellphone.
-They don’t take a lot of your schedule. Usually they are 40-80 minutes.
-You can gain certificates to prove your CPD (continuing professional development) to your (potential) employer.
-In case you miss one, you can watch the recording when it’s convenient for you.
-They keep you up-to-date with what’s new in the ELT world.
-You learn about an area that is new to you OR you deepen your knowledge in an are that you already know.

Jack Richards give these reasons for attending a workshop (workshops and webinars are practically the same thing) in his book Professional Development for Language Teachers, on page 25:
Attending workshops can provide input from experts.
Workshops offer teachers practical classroom applications.
Attending workshops can raise teachers’ motivation.
Workshops develop collegiality.
Participating in workshops can support innovations.
Workshops are short-term.
Workshops are flexible in organization.

I can’t stress the importance of attending webinars enough. If you are new to them, try them a couple of times, and you’ll become addictive.

Over to you: what is your take on webinars?

Cambridge CELTA in a Nutshell (an infographic)

Update: read this post to know the benefits of CELTA and take the quiz!

Ever since I’ve finished my CELTA in December 2014, I’ve been contacted by countless people from all over the world (I hope you are reading this post) who want to take CELTA. And always, I was happy to help my fellow colleagues.

That’s why I’ve decided to create this infographic hoping it would be helpful for teachers who don’t know what CELTA is. or what it does offer. And to function as  Cambridge CELTA introduction. Of course, this is not what all is CELTA about. To know ALL about CELTA you gotta read the CELTA Course Trainee Book, or take the course yourself  😉

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Cambridge CELTA Introduction. An infographic about Cambridge CELTA.
Cambridge CELTA Introduction. An infographic about Cambridge CELTA.

 

did you find this infographic helpful? Was it a good Cambridge CELTA Introduction?
do you have any question or comment about CELTA? then ask or comment in the comment box.

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